Good advice for litigants in person

Last week, a District Judge gave me some excellent advice for litigants in person. I am going to share it with you. ‘Appearing in court is both stressful and confusing’, he wrote.

“If asked for advice on what in particular a litigant in person needs to do, I would say that preparation is essential: get all papers and other evidence in order and easily accessible, read it all thoroughly and prepare notes on the points that will need to be made. So often parties attend court without the bare essentials and immediately they are at a disadvantage and whilst a judge will do as much as he or she can, ultimately it is the litigant who has to conduct the case.”

Note the use of the word ‘forced’. Indeed, taking someone to court should not be done lightly. It costs money, a lot of effort and a great deal of time and you can end up owing a large sum to the other party if things do not go your way.


Letting agent receiving your housing benefits?

If your council is paying housing benefits to your letting agent, for example because you are in arrears, that makes it hard to keep track of the payments to your landlord.home

Make sure that the landlord is actually receiving your housing benefits.

There could be a hiccup in a postcode, address or a reference, which could lead to your landlord not receiving your housing benefits. If you are in arrears, this would mean that your arrears continue to grow, or become higher than you are aware of.

Are you in such a situation? The first thing to do is simply to contact your letting agent in writing. Have the letting agent confirm to you in writing that they are receiving your housing benefits and are forwarding them to your landlord. Your local CAB may be able to guide you if you need help with this.

If the same applies to you but your landlord has meanwhile started eviction proceedings against you, do the same. Contact your letting agent in writing and have the letting agent confirm to you in writing how much housing benefits they have paid to your landlord, and when. It could help clear up errors before it’s too late.