Overweight air hostesses

https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/pakistan-international-airlines-cabin-crew-weight-memo-intl/index.html

Ah, this rings bells too. In 1979 and in 1980 and 1981 or thereabouts, I applied to a few airlines. My mother had always told me I might want to become an air hostess because you get to speak a few languages and get to see a bit of the world that way.

I applied three times and I got three interviews. I think it was December 1980 when I was in a deadhead seat on a flight to Frankfurt. Yes, it must have been December, indeed, because I remember that there was a Christmas market at the airport. There was snow too. It was after my season at Amsterdam’s Tourist Office.

Upon arrival, we were all told to step onto a scale. I normally weighed myself in my underwear. My home scale said my weight was 58 when I sent in my application forms. I was now asked to step onto the scale wearing a blouse, a winter sweater, a lined tweed jacket, a scarf and a heavy lined plaid and pleated winter skirt. Their scale said my weight was 60 or 61. I remember that one guy’s weight was 5 kilos more than his application form had said.

While all of us candidates were in a room at a table, being addressed, the door opened and I was removed from the room. They told me that the weight I had listed on the form had not matched what their scale had said and that I was out of the process.

They treated me like a criminal.

I swore that I would never fly with that airline again from that day (but I relied on them to take me home again).

The guy with the 5 kilo discrepancy got to stay.

In retrospect, it was a good experience because I am pretty sure that I would not have enjoyed being an air hostess at all. Well, for a while, but not for long. Too many aspects about it, certainly in those days, that I would not have liked at all. But I didn’t know that then.

I am five foot seven, by the way.

Ha ha ha – hacking is NOT illegal in the UK

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcthree/article/81172bfa-58e9-4b12-893c-7e80a731a852

British police does NOT investigate hacking.

The idea that they do is a myth.

People are told to report cyber crime to the national monitor of cyber crime, Action Fraud, but most people don’t realize that this means that the cyber crime is not actually investigated. The name of the agency sounds so nicely “active” that people fall for it and think that this agency actively investigates cyber crime, but it only keeps statistics and only if there is an economic component.

At some point, I even received a (spoofed) e-mail from Hampshire Constabulary stating that hacking, criminal harassment, business sabotage and shimmying the locks to someone else’s apartment are not crimes. I didn’t bother taking that to the police. It would have been a complete waste of my time.

For the record, what police officers sometimes do appear to do, is tick boxes in their computer programs that make it look like something has been investigated when it hasn’t. (I have proof of that, or at least of police stating to third parties that they investigated something while they didn’t, apparently for no other reason than to discredit someone and suggest that the person was psychotic or paranoid – and I have something that backs up the latter as well. It is the kind of unexpected jaw-dropping information you can uncover when you exercise your FOI rights.)

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/about-us/what-we-do/national-cyber-crime-unit