The rights of nature

My computer froze at 12:12, requiring me to throw the power of it, has been hiccuping ever since,is hiccuping now too and at 13:09 I needed to throw power off the pc again to get it out of its hacking-induced freeze. The mysterious “he” has also disabled the control-key copy/paste function again. (Oh, that’s just press duration.) And my phone told me that I was in Devon this morning. Okay. (I’m also often in Scotland.) And I had an automatically forwarded e-mail from an e-mail address that I no longer own. (And it looks like my older computer has suddenly folded again, lol.)

(14:44: I am now in the West Midlands? Location is “on” and I am not in the West Midlands, just like I was not in Devon this morning either.)

Anyway…

Last night, Hank Greely tweeted this article:

https://www.newyorker.com/science/elements/is-mars-ours

It made me remember a discussion on LinkedIn; the Dutch were contemplating giving the Wadden Sea legal status. Here is a related article. Food for thought.

https://www.openaccessgovernment.org/protect-biodiversity/102506/

If you consider the question whether humans own parts of earth or other species, you also have to ask whether other species have “priority rights” so to speak and whether other species might have claims on or against us, in view of the fact that most have been on the planet much longer than the species Homo, let alone modern humans.

(We are supposed to be the smart ones. Are we?)