“Save the children”

But abuse the women?

This morning, I responded to an action call from PETA regarding an organization that wants to support polar bears but does so by selling down coats with fur collars, among other things. Abuse of non-human animals lies at the basis of both the down and the fur.

‘Coyote’ to Protest Polar Bears International’s Canada Goose Coats

Just now, I received something from OpenDemocracy in my inbox, about its apparently still ongoing struggle with Save the Children concerning this:

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/feb/20/save-the-children-apologises-to-female-employees-over-ex-boss

https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/transformation/at-what-cost-reflection-on-crisis-at-save-children-uk/

https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/transformation/courage-of-difficult-women/

Non-human rights: Update on Happy’s case

This is straight from the e-mail I received:

Today, Justice Alison Y. Tuitt of the Bronx Supreme Court today issued a decision in the Nonhuman Rights Project’s New York elephant rights case that is powerfully supportive of our legal arguments to free Happy from the Bronx Zoo to a sanctuary.

While Justice Tuitt “regretfully” denied the habeas corpus relief the NhRP had demanded because she felt bound by prior appellate court decisions in the NhRP’s chimpanzee rights cases, she essentially vindicated the legal arguments and factual claims about the nature of nonhuman animals such as Happy that the NhRP has been making during the first six years of our rights litigation.

Deeply encouraged by Justice Tuitt’s embrace of the merits of the NhRP’s case following 13 hours of oral argument over three days, we already begun working on our appeal.

In her analysis and conclusion, Justice Tuitt agreed with New York Court of Appeals Justice Eugene M. Fahey’s conclusion that an elephant, like a chimpanzee, is not merely a “thing.” Instead, Happy “is an intelligent, autonomous being who should be treated with respect and dignity, and who may be entitled to liberty.” Further, Justice Tuitt rejected the Bronx Zoo’s claim that its continued imprisonment of Happy is good for her, stating that “the arguments advanced by the NhRP are extremely persuasive for transferring Happy from her solitary, lonely one-acre exhibit at the Bronx Zoo” to The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee.

In late 2018, Happy—currently held alone in an industrial cement structure lined with windowless, barred cages (the zoo’s “elephant barn”) while the elephant exhibit is closed for the winter—became the first elephant in the world to win a habeas corpus hearing intended to determine the lawfulness of her imprisonment after the NhRP filed a petition for a writ of habeas corpus on Happy’s behalf. Such world-renowned elephant experts as Dr. Joyce Poole and Dr. Cynthia Moss supported Happy’s rights case while making clear that the Bronx Zoo cannot meet the needs of Happy or any elephant.

While we lament Happy’s continued imprisonment, we thank Justice Tuitt for breaking ground on the long road to securing liberty and justice for Happy and other autonomous nonhuman animals. Happy’s freedom matters as much to her as ours does to us, and we won’t stop fighting in and out of court until she has it.

Anyone who’s become curious should look into the story of Guida, who’d become so severely mentally ill in her confinement that there were serious doubts about the potential for recovery.

Upon release to the Global Elephant Sanctuary in Brazil (sister of that in Tennessee), Guida bounced back remarkably. When having the choice of taking an easy path toward food or picking a difficult one, she was often observed selecting the more challenging path, which required her to climb up an edge (a small straight cliff), which took some effort.

She rejoiced in having the choice and in being able to conquer the cliff.

(I have seen something similar in a pigeon, to my utter astonishment, the animal setting herself a goal, a challenge. Also, pigeons are able to recognize individual human faces, whereas humans generally have a very hard time recognizing individual pigeons.)

Sadly, Guida is no longer with us, but at least she lived the last part of her life in friendship with another elephant and doing the kinds of things that she enjoyed doing.

Is Covid-19 a biological defence mechanism?

If you consider that toxicity in plants and animals is either a defence mechanism or an attack mechanism, and if you consider that our over-the-top attempts to kill certain bacteria have made them resistant and led to superbugs, and consider that many of the new diseases we’re seeing have either an overlap with habitat destruction of another species (us infringing) or with the ruthless exploitation of sometimes quite rare or unusual animals (trading of live animals), you can’t escape the thought that diseases like the Covid-19 virus – for which humans have no immunity yet – could be a biological (natural) defence mechanism.

If so, then there are important lessons to be learned.

The immunity that develops in the animals could then render the combination of such a virus and the animal into a defensive symbiosis.

When activism works

Dillan is a bear who many others and I have been sending e-mails and signing petitions about. It finally worked.

More animals need to be freed from the Union County Sportsmen’s Club in Millmont, PA and I’ve tried to call the facility a few times, but couldn’t get through. I’ve sent e-mails about it and I can’t rule out that I may have missed an update on the other animals, that they’ve been released to a sanctuary too. I sure hope so!

This is Dillan now:

Who is this murderer? ID, please

This man is wearing a cap, but more interestingly, he is wearing a smallish bag on his right hip, with the strap on his left shoulder. He has a beard and a mustache and he walks his dog while holding a flashlight/torch in his left hand. He puts the torch in his mouth to free his hand to open the gate.

(It is NOT a cigarette, dear Daily Mail.)

He is holding a package or small bag in his right hand.

He is trespassing, for starters. Then it gets worse.

WHAT did he do when he walked to the left after the attack began?

That action strikes me as something that makes this personal. Am I wrong? He walked to the front door of the house, by the looks of it. What did he do there?

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Who are these murdering thugs? ID, please.

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These people will shoot to kill humans around them just as easily and also for no reason other than these shooters are genuine thugs.

The vilification of pigeons

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-49256251

Anyone who has one or more pet pigeons can tell you that assuming that pigeons poop all over the place, non-stop, is just as ridiculous as assuming that humans poop all over the place, non-stop.

We are a mammal species. 

We took pigeons from their (sub)tropical sea cliffs and spread them all over the world. Pigeons are immensely intelligent creatures. In many ways, they are smarter and more capable than humans.

In addition, birds have been on the planet immensely much longer than humans, and look what WE have done to the planet. Here are two must-watch documentaries:

A bit of inspiration

Some things can’t ever be fixed or changed, but some can be made better or at least less bad, and even in cases when most people think it is not possible, like in this video below.

You can see the utterly amazed look in the animal’s eyes, before the vets put the cone on, with the gently wagging tail on the background. The “holy shit, I can’t believe it, they solved this for me?” realization. Also with the cone on. Suddenly, in the dog’s mind, she has a life again, a future. And she forgets all about the past…

What narcissistic personality disorders may be like

Like the wrong audio cables are plugged in, and you can’t change them. Creates a lot of noise!

The past ten years have taught me a lot about personality disorders. I still know very little.

Differences in the hard-wiring of the human brain can result in personality disorders, but paradoxically, people with personality disorders are often blamed for them.

While watching a lot of videos on YouTube and thinking about diversity, I am starting to wonder if the line between humans and other species may be even thinner than I already thought.

What do I mean by that? Consider the following, for example.

Francine “Penny” Patterson developed a deep friendship with a gorilla named Koko in the course of decades. It was never the plan. The plan had been a four-year research project for her PhD.

The year was 1972. Gorillas were considered dangerous and wild and Patterson initially was considered crazy by many.

When younger gorilla Michael was added to the household, he ran over to Ronald Cohn, hugged him and then “sank his teeth into” Cohn’s shoulder.

Humans are not supposed to do that, but some sort of do anyway, in their own way.

I have been the subject of a little-understood phenomenon for over ten years. In the eyes of who’s behind it (apparently involving at least one person with a narcissistic personality disorder), I am probably like an animal they keep in a cage in order to find out how it ticks, the way some university researchers keep pigs in their lab to study stress responses in pigs. They try to push my buttons as much as possible.

It’s complicated.

Penny Patterson and Ronald Cohn kept Koko in captivity, and that was accepted. If two gorillas had kept Penny or Ronald in captivity, the response would have been very different.

If you watch this video, you should also take a look at this:

What we can learn

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Quaker parrots do this too. They build humongous condos with separate areas for different activities and offer shelter to other species. Humans have a hard time doing this for their own species – yet consider themselves “superior”…