In-groups, out-groups, empathy, altruism, parochialism and disparity – but not necessarily hate

However, it can come across like that on the disadvantaged side of exclusive solidarity:

The Neuroscience of Hate: Rebecca Saxe from the Petrie-Flom Center’s channel on Vimeo.

I find this talk very enlightening, also with regard to my own situation as a migrant in the UK. I will have to do some thinking about how I can apply this knowledge.

What Rebecca Saxe calls parochialism, I call exclusive solidarity (as opposed to inclusive solidarity). Rebecca Saxe’s talk also explains that scarcity – imagined or real, as opposed to having an abundance mindset – causes it. Parochialism. When you’re afraid that there won’t be enough for all, you will only want to look after your own.

In connection with this topic, this book by Kathleen Taylor, another neuroscientist, is very enlightening as well:

 

When Buddhism goes haywire

Yesterday, I looked into Buddhist violence in Burma. That may sound like a contradiction to you, but there is a group of violent Buddhists in Burma (Myanmar) and there is one in Sri Lanka too.

If you want to read up on it, follow these links:

understandingArticle in Time: How an Extremist Buddhist Network Is Sowing Hatred Across Asia

Article in the New York Times: Sri Lanka’s Violent Buddhists

Article in BBC News: The darker side of Buddhism

Article on Al Jazeera America: Myanmar’s Buddhist terrorism problem

Article on the CNN site: Dalai Lama to Myanmar, Sri Lanka Buddhists: Stop violence against Muslims

Article in Time: Burma’s Hard-Line Buddhists Are Waging a Campaign of Hate That Nobody Can Stop